National Register of Historic Places


Bath Ranch

Near Laramie

Date Added to Register

Friday, December 13, 1985

Smithsonian Number

48AB442

Read all about it

The Bath Ranch stone house and barn are outstanding examples of late 19th century native stone construction practiced by the Bath family in and around Laramie. The buildings are constructed of eighteen inch thick stone and are the only known rural structures associated with the Baths remaining in the state. They are associated with the beginnings of the cattle ranching frontier, an episode which significantly influenced the broad patterns of Wyoming’s economic, political and social history, and with the Bath family who made significant economic impacts in the region. Henry Bath was one of the first to ranch on the plains of what is today Albany County. He established a crude homestead on the Little Laramie River at what is now the “Stone Ranch” sometime between 1869 and 1870. The original structures, consisting of a modest cabin and a small barn, no longer exist. In 1875, however, Henry and his sons quarried stone for and built the two imposing structures. The construction occurred during a period marred by the last coordinated Native American uprisings of the 19th century. The stone ranch reflects the relatively insecure period and location of its construction. Designed to repel possible Indian attack the stone ranch buildings stand as a rustic fortress in miniature.

Department of State Parks & Cultural Resources