National Register of Historic Places


Gap Puche Cabin

Near Jackson, Wyoming

Date Added to Register

Monday, June 18, 1990

Smithsonian Number

48TE1023

Read all about it

Hole. The outfitting industry has played a major role in the socioeconomic development of Jackson Hole and has made a significant contribution to the broad patterns of the region's history. The Cabin possesses exceptional significance because it is the only known surviving building historically and currently associated with the outfitting industry in Jackson Hole. It is also significant for its association with John Wort. The Worts were one of the most socially and economically prominent families in Jackson Hole. They were considered strong community leaders, with business enterprises including outfitting, a livery stable, land acquisitions, boat concessions on Jenny and Jackson Lakes, and the Wort Hotel.

The Gap Puche Cabin was built circa 1929 at the confluence of Crystal Creek and the Gros Ventre River by two brothers-in-law, Actor Nelson and Charlie Smith. Almost as soon as the cabin was built it began to be connected with the outfitting business known as Wort's Hunting Camp. John Wort and his partner Steve Callahan began using the cabin as a base camp for their outfitting business in about 1930. They hired guides for about six hunters at a time with twenty to thirty coming each season. In the 1930s they charged $35.00 per day. This was a lot of money during the depression, so their clients were usually very well to do. The cabin was used during the hunting season as a base camp. A kitchen was set up in it, and the hunters slept in tents surrounding the cabin. Between hunting seasons, the cabin was used to store gear.

In about 1935, Billy Stilson bought Mr. Callahan's interest in the outfitting company, and for a few years John Wort and Billy Stilson ran the business together. Then in 1938 or 1939 the Stilson family obtained full control of the business, including the cabin. The cabin was moved to its present location in 1942 or 1943 at the insistence of the Forest Service and area stockmen who drove cattle through the area. The Stilson family continued to operate the outfitting business in virtually the same manner as had John Wort and Steve Callahan. In 1976 Keith Stilson sold the outfitting business, including the cabin, to Gap and Peg Puche. The Puches, doing business as Crystal Creek Outfitters, have continued to use the cabin as a base camp and to guide hunters in the same manner as had the previous owners.

Department of State Parks & Cultural Resources