Contact

NR By County Test

Washakie County

 

Brian Beadles
Historic Preservation Specialist
(307) 777-8594

Try a different County or Location

  • Ainsworth House

     

     
     

    Read All About It:

    Nestled among a grove of tall cottonwoods on the west bank of the Crooked Creek drainage, the Ainsworth House was one of the first permanent habitations established in the Bighorn Basin. Frank S. Ainsworth recorded his first impressions of the Ten Sleep region in 1880: ''I kept on moving down the Big Horn and trapping as I went until I reached the junction of the Nowood...then I worked my way up the Nowood Valley...this valley pleased me more than any other place I had ever been. It was a game paradise. Buffalo roamed over the valley by the hundreds''. The numerous bison trails leading over the nearby Bighorn Mountains gave a name, Big Trails, to the dispersed ranching community which Ainsworth played a role in founding.

    In 1884 Ainsworth placed a notched log frame on a squatters right claim along the Crooked Creek bank. In the late Spring of 1885 Ainsworth and his wife arrived on the property and settled down to founding the ranch. The Ainsworth House consists of two separate, but abutting buildings. The smaller of the two buildings, constructed in 1886, is a single story wood clad and framed structure. Outside of the frame cladding are portions of additional wall extensions. This extension was added after the winter of 1887-8. Adjoining the frame structure is a substantial one and one-half story log house. This structure was constructed in two phases. The first story was added in 1890. The second phase of construction on this structure was initiated in 1911 when a ''half'' story was added. The simple vernacular home set among the hay fields and adjacent to the deeply banked Crooked Creek drainage epitomizes the small owner-operator spreads that became prevalent and continue into the present as viable adaptations to the natural environment. Ranchers like Ainsworth set the dominant pattern of land use for the stockraising community of twentieth century Wyoming.

     
    imageComingSoon-1

     

    Date Added to Register:
    Thursday, September 11, 1986
     
    Location:
    Spring Creek Road
     
    County:
    Washakie County
     
    Smithsonian Number: 
    48WA823  

     

  • Emerson Parks House

     

     
     

    Read All About It:

    The Emerson Parks House is a locally unusual example of a two-story log residence in Ten Sleep. It stands as one of the few remaining houses that represents the early history of the Ten Sleep community. It was built in 1929 for Emerson Parks and his wife Ina Miller Parks at a time before Ten Sleep became a town. Parks was a well-educated man and was a noted geologist and cartographer who had noted interests and knowledge of the underground movements of water as well as the practical uses of bentonite.

     
    imageComingSoon

     

    Date Added to Register:
    Monday, May 16, 2016
     
    Location:
    Ten Sleep
     
    County:
    Washakie County
     
    Smithsonian Number: 
    48WA2419  

     

  • Ten Sleep Hardware

     

     
     

    Read All About It:

    Previously known as the Ten Sleep Mercantile, this two story commercial structure embodies the vernacular architecture of the frontier era and has acted as a community focal point since the turn of the century. The Ten Sleep Mercantile is representative of the detached retail store featuring tall, narrow and deep interior shop space that can be found throughout rural American towns and is a style of architecture particularly associated with frontier communities. As a significant component of community life, such structures generally served dispersed rural populations. In many instances communities derived what little identity they had from stores that served not only as the community supplier but social center. H. T. Church created the Ten Sleep Mercantile in 1902. The expansion of business led to the construction of the permanent Ten Sleep Mercantile building in 1905 which quickly emerged as one of the town's principal focal points. Local merchant and historian Paul Frison operated the Ten Sleep Mercantile between 1919-1943. Frison was a prominent figure in county politics serving as a justice of the peace, mayor of Ten Sleep, and state legislator. An avid avocational historian, Frison detailed the area's history and folklore in five published books and in assorted manuscripts and texts.

     
    imageComingSoon

     

    Date Added to Register:
    Thursday, September 11, 1986
     
    Location:
    Ten Sleep
     
    County:
    Washakie County
     
    Smithsonian Number: 
    48WA817  

     

  • Worland House

     

     
     

    Read All About It:

    Constructed in 1917 for C. C. Worland, a local prominent businessman, the Worland House is an outstanding example of the bungalow style which made a significant impact on building traditions throughout the United States. The style, which suited the Wyoming environment and was easily adapted to accept ''Prairie and Craftsman'' influence, quickly became popular with both the upper and middle class. Charlie Worland, son of the town's founder was a leading businessman who demonstrated a sharp talent for accumulating wealth. Worland ran a multifaceted business operation from his home in Worland which included interests in oil, gas, minerals, farming and ranching, and influenced the broad patterns of the community's commercial development. Charlie and Sadie Worland moved into their new home in 1918. While they lived there they entertained a great deal. The basement contained a huge open room in which dances were held. These dances were attended by many young people of the town. In 1925, the house was sold to the president of the Stockgrowers State Bank, G. C. Muirhead. His family lived there for 53 years, until 1978.

     
    imageComingSoon

     

    Date Added to Register:
    Thursday, February 27, 1986
     
    Location:
    Ten Sleep
     
    County:
    Washakie County
     
    Smithsonian Number: 
    48WA824  

     

  • Worland Ranch

     

     
     

    Read All About It:

    The Worland Ranch Historic District consists of a farmstead, a historic townsite, and a historic monument marker. The working ranch and farm include prime agricultural lands used for the growing of sugar beets, malt barley, corn, and pinto beans, as well as pasture and wetlands. The buildings include the large main house, managers house, two tenant houses, a large lambing shed, and large barn and other outbuildings. The Worland Ranch is significant for its association with Charles Henry ''Dad'' Worland, founder of the first settlement of Worland, Wyoming. The Ranch contains the original townsite of Worland.

    Dad Worland first built a dugout at this site in 1900. In 1903 C.F. Robertson and his engineering survey team camped near Worland's establishment. They were investigating the feasibility of developing a large irrigation project, the Hanover Canal. The project was found to be feasible and the construction boom began; Worland's site was the center of activity. A Post Office ''Worland'' was established with Dad as the first postmaster. Businesses sprang up. Dad built in 1903-04 a two room log house just north of his dugout and operated a boarding house. Also at this time Dad was putting together a large ranch along the Fifteen Mile Creek through filing for desert land entries, purchasing property, and trading. He eventually acquired over 800 acres of land and called it the Worland Ranch. Dad continued to reside on his property, and he and his son Charlie had the existing ranch buildings built in 1917-1918. The Ranch was sold to the Wyoming Sugar Company in 1920. The property has remained a working farm/ranch under several different owners. The buildings still reflect the excellent workmanship and materials used in their original construction and are being restored by the current owners of the Worland Ranch.

     
    imageComingSoon

     

    Date Added to Register:
    Thursday, March 05, 1992
     
    Location:
    Worland
     
    County:
    Washakie County
     
    Smithsonian Number: 
    48WA157  

     

Wyoming State Historic Preservation Office

The Wyoming State Historic Preservation Office documents, preserves, and promotes Wyoming’s heritage with our preservation partners.

 

Get a Compliance Letter...

Help with Funding...

Get a Poster or purchase Archaeology wear...

How do I list a property on the NRHP?...

How do I find forms?...

Contact Us...

 

What's New

Visit Us On Facebook