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Teton County

 

Brian Beadles
Historic Preservation Specialist
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  • 4 Lazy F Ranch

     

     
     

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    The 4 Lazy F Dude Ranch is a historic district consisting of seven cabins, a lodge/dining hall, service/laundry buildings, barn, shed, and corral on the western bank of the Snake River above Moose, Wyoming. This historic district is significant because as a dude ranch it exemplifies the later period and evolution of the dude ranches as vacation spots in the area. It represents an example of complexes built strictly to be dude ranches, not one that evolved from a cattle ranch. The ranch was built in 1927 as a dude ranch and summer home for its owners, the William Frew family of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. They operated the ranch as a guest facility by invitation from the family. Throughout the late 1920s and early 1930s, as the Frews expanded the facilities, the ranch developed into a small, but typical property type. The ranch was built to convey the western feeling that constituted much of the attraction of dude ranches. The district buildings all are built in a style referred to as dude ranch vernacular, characterized by log construction with some other wood products, such as board and batten siding, used for additions or in specialized service buildings.

     
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    Date Added to Register:
    Monday, April 23, 1990
     
    Location:
    Grand Teton National Park
     
    County:
    Teton County
     
    Smithsonian Number: 
    48TE1142  

     

  • Alpenhof Lodge

     

     
     

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    Constructed in 1965, the Alpenhof Lodge was the first hotel to open in Teton Village, which helped to establish Jackson Hole as a year-round tourist destination. The development of Teton Village and the Jackson Hole Mountain Resort played a pivotal role in shaping the economy, culture, and development of Jackson Hole. Hotels like the Alpenhof were a crucial part of the success of the ski industry that helped to diversify tourism to include the winter season. The lodge was designed by architect Otto Burmell and is a prominent example of the Swiss-Alpine architecture that was envisioned by the early developers of Teton Village.

     
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    Date Added to Register:
    Tuesday, August 09, 2016
     
    Location:
    Teton Village
     
    County:
    Teton County
     
    Smithsonian Number: 
    48TE1895  

     

  • AMK Ranch

     

     
     

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    The AMK Ranch, on the eastern shore of Jackson Lake, was built in two phases, one during the 1920s by William Louis Johnson, and the second in 1936-37 by Alfred Berol (Berolzheimer). The Ranch is significant because it exemplifies a portion of Rustic architecture at Grand Teton National Park, namely the rustic architecture of twentieth century vacation homes. During Johnson's ownership of the property a small lodge, barn/garage, and boathouse were designed and built in 1927 of log to capture the western atmosphere and the feeling of the natural pine forest surroundings. After Berol acquired the property he added a number of cabins, a new boathouse, and the main lodge.

     
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    Date Added to Register:
    Monday, April 23, 1990
     
    Location:
    Grand Teton National Park
     
    County:
    Teton County
     
    Smithsonian Number: 
    48TE968  

     

  • Andy Chambers Homestead

     

     
     

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    The Andy Chambers Ranch Historic District is significant in that it remains as the only nearly complete farmstead/ranch of the once densely settled Mormon Row. Mormons made up the bulk of settlers that entered Jackson Hole from 1900 to 1920. Within a few years a discernible community had developed and even though it was not a town it was dubbed Mormon Row because of the religious preference of many of the settlers and the fact that they took up lands on either side of a road that ran north from the Gros Ventre River. Eventually a LDS church was built on the Row and the settlers started the process of turning pioneer farms into permanent ones. The Chambers place is located near the center of this settlement. The frame vernacular buildings at the farmstead date to the 1920s and include the house, an outhouse, a garage, a barn, a chicken house, a machine shed, grain storage buildings, and an oil shed.

     
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    Date Added to Register:
    Monday, April 23, 1990
     
    Location:
    Grand Teton National Park
     
    County:
    Teton County
     
    Smithsonian Number: 
    48TE995  

     

  • Bar B C Dude Ranch

     

     
     

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    The Bar B C Dude Ranch is a historic district consisting of 37 resources: a lodge, cabins, a dining hall, service/laundry buildings, barns, and corrals on the western banks of the Snake River above Moose, Wyoming. The district buildings, constructed in 1912, all are built in a style referred to as dude ranch vernacular characterized by log construction. The historic district is significant because as a dude ranch it helped define and set the standards for the local Jackson Hole industry. It is also important because it was built and operated by Struthers Burt, a local author and industry leader of dude ranching. Along with Horace Carncross, Burt operated the ranch as a guest facility until Burt's and later Carncross' retirement. It was then operated by the Corse family until after World War II when the ranch buildings became summer rental cabins.

     
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    Date Added to Register:
    Monday, April 23, 1990
     
    Location:
    Grand Teton National Park
     
    County:
    Teton County
     
    Smithsonian Number: 
    48TE915  

     

  • Cascade Canyon Barn

     

     
     

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    The Cascade Canyon Barn, also known as the Cascade Canyon Patrol Cabin when it was converted around 1960, was constructed by the CCC in 1935. Like the cabins at Upper Granite Canyon, Death Canyon, and Moran Bay, the Cascade Canyon Barn is significant for its association with Grand Teton National Park administration and development and its association with National Park Service rustic architecture.

     
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    Date Added to Register:
    Tuesday, August 18, 1998
     
    Location:
    Grand Teton National Park
     
    County:
    Teton County
     
    Smithsonian Number: 
    48TE1191  

     

  • Chapel of the Transfiguration

     

     
     

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    The Chapel of the Transfiguration is located within Grand Teton National Park on property owned and maintained by St. John's Episcopal Church of Jackson, Wyoming. The chapel is one of the most visited religious structures in America and has been seen and admired by thousands of tourists from all over the world who have visited the Tetons each summer since the chapel was built in 1925. The chapel was purposely built in the center of the dude ranch country. It was erected through private contributions as a venture of faith, and is an example of how the early settlers in the valley met their needs by sharing resources. The land was donated by Maud Noble, money was donated by the dude ranches, and labor was donated by those the chapel would serve.

     
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    Date Added to Register:
    Thursday, April 10, 1980
     
    Location:
    Grand Teton National Park
     
    County:
    Teton County
     
    Smithsonian Number: 
    48TE1083  

     

  • Cunningham Cabin

     

     
     

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    The Cunningham Cabin consists of one standing log structure believed to be the original homestead cabin in Jackson Hole built in 1888 and the scattered remains of ranch buildings and corrals. The standing building is a restoration of a double-pen saddle-V-notched log structure of Appalachian origin. It is an example of the diffusion of frontier adaptations from the eastern seaboard of the United States to the montaine west.

     
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    Date Added to Register:
    Tuesday, October 02, 1973
     
    Location:
    Grand Teton National Park
     
    County:
    Teton County
     
    Smithsonian Number: 
    48TE902  

     

  • Death Canyon Barn

     

     
     

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    The Death Canyon barn/patrol cabin and associated corral are located in the southwestern corner of Grand Teton National Park. The barn/patrol cabin is a one and one half story log building constructed on a substantial stone foundation. Like the barns/cabins at Upper Granite Canyon, Cascade Canyon, and Moran Bay, the Death Canyon Barn is significant for its association with Grand Teton National Park administration and development and for National Park Service rustic architecture. CCC crews constructed the barn at Death Canyon in 1935. It was converted to a tool-cache/habitation facility soon after dissolution of the CCC program. This modified barn housed trail-maintenance crews, rangers on a loop patrol of the southern park canyons, and, briefly, a ranger permanently stationed in the canyon in the 1950s.

     
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    Date Added to Register:
    Tuesday, August 25, 1998
     
    Location:
    Grand Teton National Park
     
    County:
    Teton County
     
    Smithsonian Number: 
    48TE1193  

     

  • Double Diamond Dude Ranch Dining Hall

     

     
     

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    The Double Diamond Dude Ranch Dining Hall, constructed in 1945, is significant for its association with rustic architecture. Significant design features include the log construction, massive stone fireplace, ranch-style floorplan, eave brackets, extensive fenestration, and the interior floorplan and finishes.

    Frank Williams and Joseph Clark Jr. opened the Double Diamond Dude Ranch in 1924 on a small 14-acre parcel of land. Initial infrastructure included a log kitchen/dining room cabin, a log lounge cabin, a small commissary cabin, and about a dozen tent cabins. The land base was expanded in 1928 when Williams and Clark purchased 40 acres of the adjacent Manges homestead. The ranch provided tent accommodations and a wilderness experience for teenage boys until 1943 when Williams constructed cabins tailored to tourists in search of more comfortable quarters. Much of the historic dude ranch was destroyed by the Taggart Lake Fire that swept across the south edge of the complex in 1985. Only five cabins and the dining hall survived the fire.

     
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    Date Added to Register:
    Tuesday, August 18, 1998
     
    Location:
    Grand Teton National Park
     
    County:
    Teton County
     
    Smithsonian Number: 
    48TE1024  

     

  • Flat Creek Ranch

     

     
     

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    The Flat Creek Ranch is located northeast of the town of Jackson at the southern base of Sheep Mountain, also known as the Sleeping Indian because of its appearance from the west, at an altitude of approximately 7500 feet. While Cal Carrington had homesteaded and built structures at the Flat Creek Ranch sometime between 1901 and 1918, the current buildings date from the 1923 construction when Eleanor ''Cissy'' Patterson (at the time Countess Gizycka) took ownership of the property and developed it as a private retreat. The Flat Creek Ranch is significant because its origins and development reflect the settlement and social development of Jackson Hole. By following the history of the Flat Creek Ranch, the various contexts of local development--early settlement, dude ranching, the emergence of hobby ranches and retreats by outside owners--take a concrete form. The ranch formed a representative and key determining element in transforming Jackson Hole from an isolated ranching valley to a haven for outsiders, especially for the nation's elite seeking remote sanctuary.

     
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    Date Added to Register:
    Monday, December 31, 2001
     
    Location:
    Northeast of Jackson
     
    County:
    Teton County
     
    Smithsonian Number: 
    48TE1281  

     

  • Gap Puche Cabin

     

     
     

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    Hole. The outfitting industry has played a major role in the socioeconomic development of Jackson Hole and has made a significant contribution to the broad patterns of the region's history. The Cabin possesses exceptional significance because it is the only known surviving building historically and currently associated with the outfitting industry in Jackson Hole. It is also significant for its association with John Wort. The Worts were one of the most socially and economically prominent families in Jackson Hole. They were considered strong community leaders, with business enterprises including outfitting, a livery stable, land acquisitions, boat concessions on Jenny and Jackson Lakes, and the Wort Hotel.

    The Gap Puche Cabin was built circa 1929 at the confluence of Crystal Creek and the Gros Ventre River by two brothers-in-law, Actor Nelson and Charlie Smith. Almost as soon as the cabin was built it began to be connected with the outfitting business known as Wort's Hunting Camp. John Wort and his partner Steve Callahan began using the cabin as a base camp for their outfitting business in about 1930. They hired guides for about six hunters at a time with twenty to thirty coming each season. In the 1930s they charged $35.00 per day. This was a lot of money during the depression, so their clients were usually very well to do. The cabin was used during the hunting season as a base camp. A kitchen was set up in it, and the hunters slept in tents surrounding the cabin. Between hunting seasons, the cabin was used to store gear.

    In about 1935, Billy Stilson bought Mr. Callahan's interest in the outfitting company, and for a few years John Wort and Billy Stilson ran the business together. Then in 1938 or 1939 the Stilson family obtained full control of the business, including the cabin. The cabin was moved to its present location in 1942 or 1943 at the insistence of the Forest Service and area stockmen who drove cattle through the area. The Stilson family continued to operate the outfitting business in virtually the same manner as had John Wort and Steve Callahan. In 1976 Keith Stilson sold the outfitting business, including the cabin, to Gap and Peg Puche. The Puches, doing business as Crystal Creek Outfitters, have continued to use the cabin as a base camp and to guide hunters in the same manner as had the previous owners.

     
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    Date Added to Register:
    Monday, June 18, 1990
     
    Location:
    Near Jackson
     
    County:
    Teton County
     
    Smithsonian Number: 
    48TE1023  

     

  • George Washington Memorial Park

     

     
     

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    Also known as the Jackson Town Square, the historic site includes the park which occupies a full city block, an elk antler arch and a stone monument of John Colter, among other non-contributing features and utilitarian objects. Prior to the creation of the park, the town square served as an informal, ill-defined, and widely-used open area around which the town's retail businesses began to locate. As a result of citizen volunteers, local officials, and federal work-relief assistance, the open space was converted into George Washington Memorial Park. That conversion in the years 1932 to 1934 reflected the commitment of the town and its citizens to civic improvement, and in the ensuing years of its historic significance, 1934-1953, the park became a defining feature and signature element of the town of Jackson. Because of the social, economic, and cultural origins of the park, because of the variety of resources that came together for its creation, and because of its prominence in the community, the park has performed a central role in the community planning and development of Jackson.

     
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    Date Added to Register:
    Friday, December 05, 2003
     
    Location:
    Jackson
     
    County:
    Teton County
     
    Smithsonian Number: 
    48TE1214  

     

  • Geraldine Lucas Homestead/ Fabian Place Historic District

     

     
     

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    Although architecturally undistinguished from hundreds of log structures that were constructed in Jackson Hole at the turn of the century, the Geraldine Lucas Homestead is unusual as the home of a pioneering single woman. In subsequent years, the cabin served as the summer home of Harold Fabian, who spearheaded John D. Rockefeller's successful effort to expand the boundaries of Grand Teton National Park to include the valley floor. The historic district is significant for its association with western settlement/agricultural development and with regional conservation. The district's period of significance extends from 1913, when Geraldine Lucas first filed for patent to 160 acres, until 1950 when Congress extended Grand Teton National Park. The historic district includes nine buildings clustered in an open meadow along the banks of Cottonwood Creek.

     
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    Date Added to Register:
    Monday, August 24, 1998
     
    Location:
    Grand Teton National Park
     
    County:
    Teton County
     
    Smithsonian Number: 
    48TE1146  

     

  • Grace and Robert Miller Ranch

     

     
     

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    The Robert E. Miller Ranch is located approximately three miles north of the town of Jackson and is situated at the bottom of the west slope of the Gros Ventre Mountains with a commanding view of Jackson Hole and the Teton Mountain Range. The site consists of three historic structures which served as the residence of Robert E. Miller, the first superintendent of Teton National Monument. The property was later transferred to what would later become the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service as a component of the National Elk Refuge. The site is significant because of its association with the historic pattern of settlement in Jackson Hole and because of its association with conservation activities. An integral component of the Robert E. and Grace G. Miller homestead, two individual structures at the site were previously listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The ranch house and the barn, built between 1895 and 1898, and the Forest Service cabin together represent an important convergence of settlement, ranching, and conservation as distinct elements of the history of Jackson Hole.

     
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    Date Added to Register:
    Friday, January 11, 2002
     
    Location:
    Jackson
     
    County:
    Teton County
     
    Smithsonian Number: 
    48TE903  

     

  • Hardeman Barns

     

     
     

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    The Hardeman Barns are a highly visible landmark along Highway 22 south of Grand Teton National Park. The buildings were constructed in 1930-1945 as part of a working ranch and include the main barn, bunkhouse, pump house, horse barn, and bull barn. The prominent main barn was built by Wesley Bircher, a notable builder responsible for several barns in the area. The barn features a dramatic gothic arch roof that was a hallmark of Bircher’s barns. The property was owned for several years by Major C.C. Moseley who achieved fame in the aeronautics industry as a founder and executive in different airlines as well as his flying schools that helped to train pilots and mechanics for service in World War II. Later the property was owned by the Hardeman family, a well-known and respected ranching family in Jackson Hole.

     
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    Date Added to Register:
    Tuesday, April 28, 2015
     
    Location:
    Wilson
     
    County:
    Teton County
     
    Smithsonian Number: 
    48TE1706  

     

  • Highlands Historic District

     

     
     

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    Although many buildings within the Highlands Historic District were not constructed until the 1950s, all adhere to a layout and design concept initiated in 1946. This historic complex represents the last privately owned and operated auto-camp/resort constructed in Grand Teton National Park in the historical period, prior to the initiation of Mission-66 concession-development schemes. It is significant for its association with dude-ranch rustic architecture and with area tourism. Although constructed over the course of three decades, the Highlands buildings are united not only by the carefully planned site layout, but also by the almost exclusive use of log for construction, the frequent inclusion of a front porch in the traditional Rocky Mountain Cabin style, and the simple design and small scale of the cabins. In an example of the overall uniformity of dude-ranch rustic design in Jackson Hole, the cabins bear a striking resemblance to those associated with the neighboring Double Diamond Dude Ranch.

    In 1914, Pennsylvania natives Harry and Elizabeth Sensenbach filed a homestead claim to 160 acres along the east bank of Cottonwood Creek. By the late 1920s, in a pattern witnessed throughout Jackson Hole, the Sensenbach's augmented their meager ranching income with tourist dollars, renting a few cabins, and serving ''soft drinks and hard liquor'' to area visitors. Two tourist cabins, a second-generation residence, and the grave site of the Sensenbach's son (on original homestead acreage outside the historic district boundaries), date from this period of the site's history.

    Charles Byron and Jeanne Jenkins and Gloria Jenkins Wardell purchased the Highlands site in 1946. From this date until 1956, they methodically added ''one or two cabins a year'' in a U-shaped pattern anchored by a large log/board-and-batten lodge. The lodge, originally envisioned as a ''Tyrollean type'' to conform to the frequent use of Swiss architecture in national parks, was instead constructed in the more typical regional rustic style. The Jenkins sold the Highlands to the National Park Service in 1972. The Park Service converted the buildings to seasonal quarters for temporary employees.

     
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    Date Added to Register:
    Wednesday, August 19, 1998
     
    Location:
    Grand Teton National Park
     
    County:
    Teton County
     
    Smithsonian Number: 
    48TE1144  

     

  • Huckleberry Mountain Fire Lookout

     

     
     

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    Located near the summit of Huckleberry Mountain, the Huckleberry Mountain Lookout is the only remaining fire detection building in the northern portion of the Teton National Forest. The Lookout, constructed in 1938, is representative of the early fire protection methods and policies of the United State Forest Service, and is a significant example of rustic design employed by the Forest Service and built by the Civilian Conservation Corps during the first half of the twentieth century.

    The Lookout was used for fire detection for forest fires during the summer and fall months and was first manned in 1939. The development of new fire policies, new methods of fire detection, such as the reporting done by public and private aircraft, and the use of modern radio repeater stations all contributed to the decline of fire lookouts. After the 1957 summer season, the Huckleberry Lookout was abandoned for regular lookout service.

     
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    Date Added to Register:
    Friday, July 08, 1983
     
    Location:
    Bridger-Teton National Forest
     
    County:
    Teton County
     
    Smithsonian Number: 
    48TE910  

     

  • Huff Memorial Library

     

     
     

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    The impressive building that housed the Huff Memorial Library, also known as the Teton County Library, in Jackson, Wyoming is a single story log building constructed between 1938 and 1940. The significance of this building rests in its association with the growth of the community in ways that reach beyond traditional conceptions of education, or even beyond economics and culture, ways that reflect community needs and participation and commitment. Many institutions such as libraries are public in name, but this one derived from the people throughout the community, including people from its most renowned leaders to its humblest citizens who shared in common their value of the written word.

     
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    Date Added to Register:
    Friday, December 05, 2003
     
    Location:
    Jackson
     
    County:
    Teton County
     
    Smithsonian Number: 
    48TE1805  

     

  • Hunter Hereford Ranch Historic District

     

     
     

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    The Hunter Hereford Ranch has a diverse history, extending from 1909 when James Williams homesteaded 160 acres, throughout the 1940s and 1950s when William Hunter, Eileen Hunter, and ranch foreman John Anderson developed the site into a prototype of Jackson Hole ''Hobby Ranches'', to the 1960s when the site and its plethora of log buildings and spectacular views was chosen as the town site in the western film The Wild Country. The historic district is significant for its association with the growth of hobby ranches and for its association with vernacular architecture and with architect-designed rustic architecture. After William Hunter's death, Eileen Hunter sold the property to the National Park Service in 1957 yet retained rights to the water, land, grazing, and buildings for the remainder of her lifetime. Management of the ranch remained in John Anderson's hands for over twenty years. Upon Eileen Hunter's death in 1989, the National Park Service leased the rights to Hunter Hereford and adjacent Smith-Talbot infrastructure to the Triangle X Dude Ranch. This lease agreement was terminated in 1991 and the buildings abandoned as part of the Park Service's long-term plans to return the area to its natural state.

     
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    Date Added to Register:
    Monday, August 24, 1998
     
    Location:
    Grand Teton National Park
     
    County:
    Teton County
     
    Smithsonian Number: 
    48TE1158  

     

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