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Laramie County

 

Brian Beadles
Historic Preservation Specialist
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  • 19th Street Castle

     

     
     

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    The 19th Street Castle, built in 1914, is Cheyenne's purest form of Mission Style architecture. Built on the crest of a hill and sitting on more than a full lot, this dominant structure serves as a local landmark. The massive two-story residence is a wood frame structure finished with coarse aggregate concrete, left natural. This structure's significance is based in relation to its original owner and builder and its architectural value. Thomas Heaney, the originator of this residence, was a prominent businessman in Cheyenne during the early 20th century. He owned and operated the Atlas Theatre with great success. Heaney also owned and managed the Tivoli Bar and Restaurant in Cheyenne. In 1910, he ran for and won the office of State Senator, serving Laramie County.

     
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    Date Added to Register:
    Tuesday, July 10, 1979
     
    Location:
    Cheyenne
     
    County:
    Laramie County
     
    Smithsonian Number: 
    48LA201  

     

  • Atlas Theatre

     

     
     

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    The Atlas Building is a three-story brick structure located on Sixteenth Street, a main thoroughfare in what has historically been the heart of Cheyenne's downtown business district. The Atlas Building was constructed in 1887 and until 1908 the top two floors were utilized for office space by professional men while the bottom floor was a tea and confectionery shop. In August 1907 architectural drawings were completed for a remodeling of the Atlas Building to provide several enterprises including a theater. The architect in charge of the work was William Dubois, a prominent citizen in the city and the state. The Atlas remained open until December 1929. Two months later the theater opened again as the ''Strand'', under the control of the Publix Theatre chain. Research into the history of the Strand indicates the theater may have closed by August of 1931, and that in later years it twice reopened and closed. From 1955 to 1961 the building was not used as a theater, and in 1961 the Atlas Building was the location of the Pink Pony night club. When the Pink Pony operation was abandoned in 1963 the building remained vacant until 1966 when a local theater group, the Cheyenne Little Theatre Players, provided an opportunity for the theater to again house an audience. In 1971 that organization purchased the Atlas property.

     
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    Date Added to Register:
    Tuesday, April 03, 1973
     
    Location:
    Cheyenne
     
    County:
    Laramie County
     
    Smithsonian Number: 
    48LA64  

     

  • Baxter Ranch Headquarters

     

     
     

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    Also known as the Log Cabin, the Baxter Ranch Headquarters Buildings are located just east of downtown Cheyenne. The two-story log cabin and the log barn were once part of the George W. Baxter Ranch headquarters which was located in the Hillsdale area about twenty miles east of Cheyenne. The two structures, built about 1885, were moved to Cheyenne around 1904 by the F. E. Warren family who owned the lots at this location. The log cabin was converted into a two-story, four unit apartment building while the log barn became a two-story duplex. To move the structures was a major undertaking. They were dismantled log by log, and each log was numbered and replaced in its exact original position. The Log Cabin and barn are among the last log structures remaining in Cheyenne, and the log cabin is the only ''log mansion'' in the city.

     
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    Date Added to Register:
    Thursday, June 14, 1979
     
    Location:
    Cheyenne
     
    County:
    Laramie County
     
    Smithsonian Number: 
    48LA96  

     

  • Boeing United Airlines Terminal Building, Hangar and Fountain

     

     
     

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    The Boeing United Airlines structures in Cheyenne were built between 1929 and 1934. The terminal building was constructed for Boeing Air Transport in 1929 and exhibits influences from the Fullivan School of Architecture including the asymmetrical facade, the decorative brickwork, and the external expression of the skeleton structure which implies some of the interior arrangements. The large hangar building was designed by a Cheyenne architect, Frederic Porter, Sr., and was built in 1930. In 1934, United Airlines constructed a fountain as a memorial to early aviation history. It is located in the median of 8th Avenue, directly south of the terminal building. The fountain, constructed of terra cotta blocks, exhibits design elements that are associated with the Art Deco Style. The terminal building, hangar, and fountain stand as major symbols of a time when the Cheyenne Municipal Airport was a flourishing air transportation center of national importance.

     
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    Date Added to Register:
    Thursday, February 07, 1985
     
    Location:
    Cheyenne
     
    County:
    Laramie County
     
    Smithsonian Number: 
    48LA548  

     

  • Capitol North Historic District

     

     
     

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    The Capitol North District, built between 1905 and 1930 is a good blend of middle to upper class housing stock, primarily of frame construction with clapboard siding. Frame styles range from single story plains cottages to two story picturesque cottages. Several streets have brick veneer and brick construction houses in two story cottage modes and eclectic villa forms. Much of the architectural character of the district derives from the similarity of features of the properties. Because of its proximity to the State Capitol and other State buildings, this district has provided housing for officials of state government including governors, state legislators, lawyers, judges, and other elected professionals. The district's development and evolution is a direct results of the construction of the state capitol and the expansion of government related functions.

     
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    Date Added to Register:
    Wednesday, December 10, 1980
     
    Location:
    Cheyenne
     
    County:
    Laramie County
     
    Smithsonian Number: 
    48LA427  

     

  • Cheyenne Flour Milling Company

     

     
     

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    The building currently owned by Wattle and Daub Contractors, Inc. is located at 810-814 West 23rd Street on the northwest side of the original commercial district of the City of Cheyenne, Wyoming. The warehouse building was constructed in ca. 1915-1916 with two story brick addition constructed in 1927. It is significant because it represents the early twentieth century commercial activity in Cheyenne. Cheyenne had its origins as a railroad town created in 1867 by the construction of the first transcontinental railroad, making it an important transportation center from its inception. Therefore, its commercial history was inextricably tied to the railroad. This property was accessed by railroad sidings on the east and west sides that have been removed, but the building is still adjacent to the railroad mainline. The brick warehouse is a typical example of early twentieth century factory/warehouse architecture and served as the Cheyenne Milling Company flour mill, a Standard Oil Company bulk oil storage facility, an electrical supplies storage facility, a potato chip factory, the Mountain States Telephone and Telegraph Company wholesale outlet, the Owyhee Chemical Products Company laboratory, and the N.O. Nelson Plumbing warehouse during its long history.

     
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    Date Added to Register:
    Monday, October 13, 2003
     
    Location:
    Cheyenne
     
    County:
    Laramie County
     
    Smithsonian Number: 
    48LA756  

     

  • Cheyenne Public Schools

     

     
     

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    Public education was a primary concern of Cheyenne's citizens from its beginnings in 1867-68 as a ''track town'' along the first transcontinental railroad, the Union Pacific. The Territory of Wyoming was created in 1868, and Cheyenne was designated the temporary capital. Previously, the first school was established for officers' children at Fort Laramie in 1852, and in 1860, Judge W. A. Carter built a school at Fort Bridger and hired a teacher for his own children and a few of the other children. However, neither of these facilities could be considered public schools. The first session of the Wyoming Legislative Assembly in 1869 organized the territorial school system in ''An Act providing for the organization of school districts, schools and for other purposes.'' The act was based on the Dakota Territory Statutes of 1862. The general organization was quite simple, consisting of a territorial superintendent of public instruction, a county superintendent for each county, and the establishment of school districts within each county. Here are the ten Cheyenne schools listed on the National Register:

    • Cheyenne High School (LCSD No. 1 Administration Building)
    • Lulu McCormick Junior High School (Emerson State Office Building)
    • Mabel Fincher School (Triumph High School)
    • Deming Elementary School
    • Corlett Elementary School
    • Park Addition School (Chaplin School)
    • Churchill Elementary School
    • Hebard Elementary School
    • Johnson Junior High School
    • Storey Gymnasium
     
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    Date Added to Register:
    Monday, August 22, 2005
     
    Location:
    Cheyenne
     
    County:
    Laramie County
     
    Smithsonian Number: 
    48LA3170  

     

  • Cheyenne South Side Historic District

     

     
     

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    The Cheyenne South Side Historic District is adjacent to the Union Pacific Railroad freight yards on the south and is physically separated by the tracks from Cheyenne’s original commercial district and residential neighborhoods. The City of Cheyenne was a railroad town created by the building of the first transcontinental railroad by the Union Pacific Railway, which laid tracks through the region in 1867, so that the original focus of the town was the rail yards and depot. This district is unique in that it represents a working class neighborhood, originally dependent on the railroad for employment and separated from Cheyenne by the intervening multiple tracks and freight yards.

    Cheyenne was only one of six major towns that emerged along the right-of-way of the first transcontinental railroad built by the Union Pacific Railroad in 1867 and 1868 through the frontier region that soon became southern Wyoming territory. In early 1868, it was selected by the Union Pacific Railroad as the site of its principal depot and repair shops due to its strategic location at the eastern base of the Rocky Mountains, midway between the cities of Omaha, Nebraska, and Ogden, Utah. The South Side comprises the original “blue collar” residential area of Cheyenne and includes the southern half of the original city plat as filed in 1867 by General Grenville M. Dodge, chief engineer of the Union Pacific Railroad.

     
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    Date Added to Register:
    Wednesday, October 11, 2006
     
    Location:
    Cheyenne
     
    County:
    Laramie County
     
    Smithsonian Number: 
    48LA1261  

     

  • Cheyenne Veterans Administration Hospital Historic District

     

     
     

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    The Cheyenne VA Hospital Historic District, currently known as the Cheyenne Veterans Affairs Medical Center, is significant for its association with the federal government’s commitment to the health care of World War I and World War II veterans. Construction for the Cheyenne VA Hospital began in 1932, and the hospital opened in 1934. Construction of additional buildings and structures continued within the historic district throughout the latter half of the twentieth century. The Cheyenne VA Hospital Historic District was originally designated a general medical and surgical hospital serving veterans of southeastern Wyoming, northern Colorado and western Nebraska. The historic district continues to retain a campus setting with a monumental main building, and the hierarchal use of architectural decorative elements on the exteriors of the buildings creating a cohesive architectural district.

     
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    Date Added to Register:
    Wednesday, May 01, 2013
     
    Location:
    Cheyenne
     
    County:
    Laramie County
     
    Smithsonian Number: 
    48LA2960  

     

  • City-County Building

     

     
     

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    The City-County Building, completed in 1919, is significant for its historic associations with the development of the City of Cheyenne and Laramie County governments. The building is a fine example of the Classic Revival Style, and is significant for the quality of its craftsmanship and detailing. Originally, the City-County Building housed fourteen county and six city offices, along with courts for each level of government. Additionally, the United States Internal Revenue and Prohibition offices were also located here. The site of the City-County Building has some very interesting history behind it. The original Laramie County Courthouse, built in 1873, stood on the same site. It was the second courthouse erected in Wyoming Territory, and served as the Wyoming Territorial Capitol Building for the 1873 legislative session. The most famous case heard in this courthouse was that of a former Indian scout, and later cattle detective, Tom Horn. The original Laramie County Courthouse was razed in 1917.

     
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    Date Added to Register:
    Thursday, November 30, 1978
     
    Location:
    Cheyenne
     
    County:
    Laramie County
     
    Smithsonian Number: 
    48LA94  

     

  • Continental Oil Company

     

     
     

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    The buildings currently owned by Steel Creek Trailer Sales, Inc. are located at 801 West 19th Street on the west side of the original commercial district of the City of Cheyenne, Wyoming. This property consists of three related buildings, two of which are significant because they represent the early twentieth century commercial activity in Cheyenne. Cheyenne had its origins as a railroad town created in 1867 by the construction of the first transcontinental railroad, making it an important transportation center from its inception. Therefore, its commercial history was inextricably tied to the railroad. The warehouse building at this location was constructed in ca. 1905 and was accessed by a railroad siding on the east side. The brick warehouse is a well-preserved example of early twentieth century factory/warehouse architecture and served as a bulk oil storage facility operated by the Continental Oil Company (Conoco). Oil and other fuels were hauled in by railroad cars, then unloaded for local distribution for home heating fuel and to serve several Cheyenne retail auto services stations.

     
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    Date Added to Register:
    Monday, October 13, 2003
     
    Location:
    Cheyenne
     
    County:
    Laramie County
     
    Smithsonian Number: 
    48LA717  

     

  • Crook House

     

     
     

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    The W. W. Crook House, constructed in 1885, is significant for its historical role in the social-political milieu of the Rocky Mountain Region and as one of the few remaining examples of Queen Anne architecture in Wyoming. The Crook House faces south on 21st Street, in an area that was once the original city of Cheyenne. Its setting, comprised of old cottonwoods, a cobblestone drive and an ornate carriage house, and its placement next to the old Greek Revival Governor's Mansion creates a scene from a bygone era.

     
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    Date Added to Register:
    Tuesday, July 10, 1979
     
    Location:
    Cheyenne
     
    County:
    Laramie County
     
    Smithsonian Number: 
    48LA428  

     

  • Crow Creek/Cole Ranch Headquarters Historic District

     

     
     

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    The Crow Creek/Cole Ranch Headquarters historic district, with its distinctive buildings, irrigation ditch, grazing lands, and irrigated hay meadow, represents cattle ranching in southeastern Wyoming during a long period of significance, the period between 1879 and 1972. The property, developed by Andrew Gilchrist as the Crow Creek Ranch during the early cattle bonanza years of the 1870s, represents both that era as well as the Cole family ranching operation, which was characteristic of stock raising in Laramie County. Thus the period of significance extends until 1972 when the ranch property was subdivided for hobby ranch and residential use. The historic district is eligible under Criterion A as representative of agriculture and cattle ranching. The 1890 bank barn is eligible under Criterion C as a noteworthy example of a bank barn with stone basement and upper level designed for hay storage.

    The Crow Creek/Cole Ranch headquarters historic district is located on the north side of South Crow Creek in the Happy Valley area of southwestern Laramie County. The 49-acre property located south of Happy Jack Road is adjacent to an area with some residential development. The ranch headquarters is situated between a ridge and the South Crow Creek. A gravel road follows the lower contours of the ridge at the edge of the creek bottom to the ranch property and terminates there. The road and buildings are oriented to the creek, which runs from the southwest to the northeast.

    The ranch headquarters district consists of several components, including a large bank barn with a stone basement level, a stone two-room bunkhouse, a stone residence now clad with stucco, and a well constructed prior to 1890. A fenced corral located southeast of the barn and a metal quonset building were erected in 1950. An outhouse and root cellar, and the Gilchrist No. 1 irrigation ditch complete the set of buildings and structures. Also encompassed in the district are the hay meadow north of the creek, grazing land to the west of the buildings, and the bluff and grazing land to the north. A chicken house erected in 1982 replaced an earlier building; the chicken house post-dates the period of significance and is the only non-contributing resource.

     

     
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    Date Added to Register:
    Tuesday, July 14, 2009
     
    Location:
    Cheyenne
     
    County:
    Laramie County
     
    Smithsonian Number: 
    48LA3178  

     

  • Dereemer Ranch Historic District

     

     
     

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    In 1888, Charles A. Dereemer was one of the early settlers on a small ranch in the Horse Creek region of Laramie County. Dereemer successfully utilized the prairie grasses around Horse Creek to transform his ranch into a successful operation. Many of the county's early ranchers on small tracks of land failed, yet Dereemer was able to contribute to the agricultural and economic growth of northwest Laramie County. The Dereemer Ranch complex is an exceptional representative example of a small ranch that developed in response to the burgeoning agriculture/industry of the county. The log and frame buildings within the complex, constructed in response to specific needs of the owners, embody the distinctive characteristics of a type, period and method of construction typical of high plains ranching.

     
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    Date Added to Register:
    Friday, November 25, 1983
     
    Location:
    Horse Creek
     
    County:
    Laramie County
     
    Smithsonian Number: 
    48LA610  

     

  • Downtown Cheyenne Historic District

     

     
     

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    The Downtown Cheyenne Historic District encompasses an area of approximately seven blocks in the core of Cheyenne's earliest business district. Dating from the late 1800s, most of the buildings represent the first permanent masonry commercial structures in Cheyenne. The architecture is eclectic with a heavy emphasis on commercial Victorian construction. The Historic District primarily owes its significance to the fact it is the original core of Cheyenne's Central Business District (CBD). When James R. Whitehead opened up the Union Pacific Land Office on July 9, 1867, lots in the proposed district were among the first sold. The area quickly became the heart of commercial activity and has continued to play a significant role as part of the CBD. The district's historic buildings were constructed from 1872 until the late 1920s. Generally, this period represents Cheyenne's first half century growth, in which the tiny frontier ''tent town'' grew into a Territorial, then a State, Capitol City. The buildings in the Historic District represent a broad range of activities that took place during Cheyenne's first 50 or 60 years. The breweries, saloons, boarding houses, and the quick inexpensive eating establishments, often referred to as railroad houses, all played an important role in the growth and development.

     
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    Date Added to Register:
    Friday, December 22, 1978
     
    Location:
    Cheyenne
     
    County:
    Laramie County
     
    Smithsonian Number: 
    48LA204  

     

  • Downtown Cheyenne Historic District Expansions

     

     
     

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    In early 1987, downtown Cheyenne was resurveyed to determine if the downtown district boundaries could be expanded based on a new cutoff date of 1941 (rather than 1929) and on restoration and rehabilitation activity in the area. The survey determined that one and one-half blocks could be added to the district based on these criteria. The buildings in the area added to the Downtown Cheyenne Historic District were all constructed during the 20th century and three architectural types can be distinguished: 1) a continuation of 19th century commercial architecture traditions; 2) the so-called panel brick type; and 3) the Moderne style.

    In 1995, downtown Cheyenne was again resurveyed to determine the feasibility of expansion and consolidation of the district boundaries. All buildings within the Downtown Cheyenne Historic District were reevaluated during this survey. The revised District contains ninety-six buildings, sixty-seven of which are considered to be contributing elements to the District. Buildings include structures built for commercial, financial, social, recreational, and transportational purposes. The boundaries were drawn to include all buildings that reflect or contribute to the visual and historical nature of the area, and to exclude areas containing noncontributing buildings wherever possible.

     
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    Date Added to Register:
    Friday, May 20, 1988
     
    Location:
    Cheyenne
     
    County:
    Laramie County
     
    Smithsonian Number: 
    48LA204  

     

  • Dubois Block

     

     
     

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    The Dubois Block is a collection of seven houses, six of which Cheyenne architect William R. Dubois designed for himself , his family and his friends. The seventh house was designed after Dubois’ death by a former draftsman for Dubois’ youngest daughter. The block represents architect-designed residential styles popular in the first several decades of the 20th century when Cheyenne was experiencing growth in government services, military operations, and transportation including the railroad, the Lincoln Highway and air travel. Dubois was a prolific and greatly respected architect in Cheyenne. He designed more than seventy commercial buildings and about forty school buildings across the state.

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    Date Added to Register:
    Tuesday, December 02, 2014
     
    Location:
    Cheyenne
     
    County:
    Laramie County
     
    Smithsonian Number: 
    48LA3265  

     

  • Federal Office Building

     

     
     

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    In 1928 Congress passed the first of two National Building Acts that authorized the construction of federal buildings throughout the nation. This massive building program was one of the first efforts undertaken by the federal government to alleviate the unemployment caused by the Depression. The Federal Office Building in Cheyenne was built in 1932 to house Treasury Department operations. Its style is typical of the simplified Neo-classicism utilized for many of the federal buildings constructed by the building program. It was designed by William Dubois, a regionally prominent architect. The original three story 1932 portion of the building was designed with a structural capacity to support an additional four stories. The building has experienced little exterior alteration since the 1937 addition of a fourth story and an elevator access.

     
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    Date Added to Register:
    Thursday, October 12, 2000
     
    Location:
    Cheyenne
     
    County:
    Laramie County
     
    Smithsonian Number: 
    48LA860  

     

  • Ferdinand Lafrentz House

     

     
     

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    The Ferdinand W. Lafrentz House was built in the 1880s and is representative of the type of frame cottage that was constructed in Cheyenne during the last quarter of the nineteenth century. The Lafrentz property related directly or indirectly to at least three people of importance on the local level, two of whom departed Cheyenne to rise to positions of national importance: Lloyd Fredendall, Ferdinand W. Lafrentz, and Robert N. LaFontaine.

     
     

     

    Date Added to Register:
    Tuesday, July 17, 1979
     
    Location:
    Cheyenne
     
    County:
    Laramie County
     
    Smithsonian Number: 
    48LA99  

     

  • First United Methodist Church

     

     
     

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    The First United Methodist Church was begun in 1890 and completed in 1894. The church building was designed by Architect J. P. Julien, whose name appears on the cornerstone, and was constructed by Moses Patrick Keefe. Keefe was the builder of many early homes and offices in Cheyenne. His work includes Saint Mary's Catholic Cathedral, several structures at Fort D. A. Russell, and the second phase of construction on the Wyoming State Capitol. The building was constructed of Wyoming red sandstone.

     
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    Date Added to Register:
    Tuesday, February 25, 1975
     
    Location:
    Cheyenne
     
    County:
    Laramie County
     
    Smithsonian Number: 
    48LA65  

     

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