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Carbon County

 

Brian Beadles
Historic Preservation Specialist
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  • Stone Wall Ranch

     

     
     

    Read All About It:

    The Stone Wall Ranch was the first permanent ranch homestead within the Little Snake River Valley. Founded by one of the valley's first permanent cattle raising residents, Noah Reader, in 1871, the ranch retains material culture elements that embody the relationship between stockmen and the local environment--elements that express an articulation between a mode of livelihood and local environmental constraints. The ranch name derived from the natural sandstone escarpment that still forms the back (north) wall of the ranch's main corral. The Stone Wall Ranch is significant because it is the first permanent settlement in the Little Snake River Valley and because of its unique environmental setting. Cultural elements of the property are integrated with the environmental features and elicit a feeling of confinement rather than the open spaciousness so common among Wyoming ranches.

     
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    Date Added to Register:
    Monday, September 29, 1986
     
    Location:
    Near Savery
     
    County:
    Carbon County
     
    Smithsonian Number:
    48CR3572

     

  • Union Pacific Railroad Depot

     

     
     

    Read All About It:

    The Union Pacific Railroad Depot is a one-story brick and granite transportation structure with Richardsonian Romanesque elements constructed in 1901 with a baggage and telegraph addition to the west side (1901-1903) and an Eating House addition to the east side (1903-1912). The Depot is representative of the influence of the railroad and its transportation connections as related to the development and growth of Rawlins. The railroad served as a reason for settlement and its transportation links provided support for the development of other industries and expansion of the city.

     
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    Date Added to Register:Thursday, September 02, 1993
     
    Location:
    Rawlins
     
    County:
    Carbon County
     
    Smithsonian Number:
    48CR1223

     

  • Virginian Hotel

     

     
     

    Read All About It:

    The Virginian Hotel, constructed in 1911, is a freely adapted example of Renaissance Revival architecture in the Italian style located in the small town of Medicine Bow, Wyoming. Medicine Bow is the setting for perhaps the greatest of all Western novels, The Virginian, written by Owen Wister. Located in the Laramie Plains, a large expanse of grazing land in the Northwestern Plains, the town grew up as a railroad shipping point for cattle, sheep and wool. Before the arrival of the Union Pacific Railroad in June, 1868, Medicine Bow was the site of a tie operation, where logs and railroad ties cut in the Medicine Bow Mountains and floated down rushing mountain currents, gathered behind a boom stretched across the Medicine Bow River. With the addition of a water tank and roundhouse, the settlement became a permanent railroad station along a great transcontinental route.

    Author Wister, who crisscrossed Wyoming fifteen time in the years 1885-1902, borrowed scenes from the country around Medicine Bow for his book, which was written in 1902. The Virginian Hotel did not play a role in that book. August Grimm, who with George Plummer was responsible for building the hotel, may have had in mind the fame of that great American novel, but the hotel probably was not built to honor Wister or the hero of his novel.

    Although cowboys, as well as railroad workers needed a place to stay when they arrived in town, the hotel was built to serve a clientele from a much wider area. The significance of the Virginian Hotel rests upon its architecture and its role in local history. The Virginian stands as a physical landmark and as a commercial landmark in the town of Medicine Bow.

     
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    Date Added to Register:
    Monday, May 22, 1978
     
    Location:
    Medicine Bow
     
    County:
    Carbon County
     
    Smithsonian Number:
    48CR1196

     

  • Washakie Station

     

     
     

    Read All About It:

    The history of Washakie Station, a stage station on the Overland Trail, begins in the early 1860s. Unlike stage stations east of Bridger's Pass, Washakie Station and others west of it were built of native stone quarried locally. Floors and roofs were usually made of poles and dirt, and the buildings usually faced south or east. Portions of a few crumbled walls, consisting of red sandstone slabs of varying sizes, are all that remain of this particular station. Foundation stones of what was probably a corral and hay storage shed are located nearby.

     
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    Date Added to Register:
    Tuesday, December 12, 1978
     
    Location:
    Carbon County
     
    County:
    Carbon County
     
    Smithsonian Number:
    48CR464

     

  • Willis House

     

     
     

    Read All About It:

    The Willis House is a two-story modified American Four Square style house built in 1908. It is the only two-story masonry clad residential building in the town of Encampment. The house was built by Mrs. Lydia M. Willis to be a deluxe house of prostitution and the headquarters of the Willis business empire. Mrs. Willis never finished the inside of the house. In 1931, the house was acquired and finished by Mr. Charles Deo Terwilliger, a locally prominent and respected rancher and merchant.

     
    Willis

     

    Date Added to Register:
    Thursday, March 29, 2001
     
    Location:
    Encampment
     
    County:
    Carbon County
     
    Smithsonian Number:
    48CR7566

     

  • Wyoming State Penitentiary

     

     
     

    Read All About It:

    The Wyoming State Penitentiary is one of Wyoming's most significant historic sites. The penitentiary complex is historically and architecturally important on both a local and regional level. The placement of the State Penitentiary in Rawlins reflected the political and economic realities of nineteenth century Wyoming, and its construction and use provided a stabilizing influence for the railroad town. As one of the oldest state-supported institutions, it serves as a physical reminder of the tenets of the Wyoming Constitution and associated legislation. The Romanesque buildings at the state prison architecturally describe the prevalent stylistic concerns in Wyoming in the late nineteenth to early twentieth century. Within the boundaries of the State Penitentiary's Historic District are buildings that range in construction date from 1891. The historic buildings can generally be divided into three stylistic categories: Romanesque, Mission, and utilitarian. The Romanesque structures, such as the administration building, cell block A, laundry, guard quarters-powerhouse complex, and commissary, are distinctive public buildings constructed of stone. The prison's association with a prominent architect, Walter E. Ware, also contributes to the penitentiary's architectural importance.

     
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    Date Added to Register:
    Thursday, May 26, 1983
     
    Location:
    Rawlins
     
    County:
    Carbon County
     
    Smithsonian Number:
    48CR1198

     

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